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IN PRINT & ON TV ... Faculty quoted on invasive plants, obesity, election, more

By Amy Agronis on November 19, 2004 in University

Comments and research by UC Davis community members regularly appear in a wide variety of news media outlets. Among the recent citings…

Fish biologist Peter Moyle and psychiatrist Richard Maddock were quoted in separate articles in the Oct. 29 Sacramento Bee. Moyle contributed to a story on the annual salmon run through the American River. "The salmon are a high-priority species, so they get their water," said Moyle, "but when it comes to choosing between water and people, salmon will ultimately lose." The wildlife, fish and conservation biology professor went on to say that recreational fishing would not harm the fish.

Meanwhile, Maddock, a professor at the School of Medicine, was cited in a story about why humans enjoy being frightened. He said a state of arousal while remaining in control is responsible for the popularity of scary experiences like watching horror movies. …

Nutrition professor Judith Stern appeared in an article about obesity in the Oct. 30 edition of The New Scientist. Stern pointed to increasing meal portions as a factor, saying, "You eat more, even if you don't finish it." …

Neurology, physiology and behavior professor Gabrielle Nevitt's recent research was cited in several newspapers, including the Oct. 29 Seattle Times and the Oct. 28 San Francisco Chronicle. Nevitt and a colleague have found that some birds use scent to locate their mates. …

Ed Costantini lent his political expertise to the San Francisco Chronicle twice within a week. The professor emeritus of political science first commented on California's record rise in voter registration on Oct. 29. He said the increase is "in large part due to the presidential race and the intensity of feeling and the organizational effort that's gone into increasing the number of voters." Then, on Nov. 4, Costantini contributed to an article on Governor Schwarzenegger's campaigning efforts for President Bush. …

Ralph De Vere White also appeared in the Nov. 4 Chronicle, in a story on the future of stem cell research. The director of the Cancer Center said the bond investment must provide something of long-term value. "We don't want to just see how many different projects we can fund right away," White said, "and then find out five years later the money is gone, we haven't really made any outstanding discoveries and we haven't even built anything." …

Bill Lloyd of the ophthalmology department at the medical center was interviewed on CNN: Live Saturday about memory loss. During the Oct. 30 show, Lloyd highlighted several ways to combat memory loss that accompanies aging, including playing games that boost memory like Scrabble, learning a new language, and taking up an instrument. …

Chair of the political science department Walter Stone was quoted about Ralph Nader's diminished role in the presidential race in the Nov. 3 Washington Post. "Third-party candidates depend on the feeling that the Democrats and Republicans are standing for the same things," Stone said. "That case couldn't be made as effectively this year." …

An engineering study by a team of UC Davis researchers was cited in a Nov. 12 Los Angeles Times article on the possible restoration of Yosemite's Hetch Hetchy Valley. The group found that Hetch Hetchy is no longer critical to California's water storage and that downstream reservoirs, including Don Pedro, could store the same amount of water. …

Ishwarlal Jialal, a researcher at the medical center, appeared in the Nov. 11 Washington Post questioning a recent study suggesting Vitamin E could be harmful. "Vitamin E is clearly an antioxidant and an anti-inflammatory agent," he said, "and it's been shown in some studies to reduce heart disease either alone or in combination with Vitamin C." …

Lars Anderson was quoted extensively in a story about the invasive hyacinth weed in the Nov. 1 Bakersfield Californian. "The flower is quite attractive, but people don't realize how invasive it is and how fast it grows," said the aquatic weed lab director. "Unfortunately, it's still being sold, even here in Davis, for ornamental ponds. It's legal, but it shouldn't be."

Media contact(s)

Amy Agronis, Dateline, (530) 752-1932, abagronis@ucdavis.edu

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