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Plant Biology

This minor explores plants and their dynamic means of interacting with the environment. The Plant Biology minor has an 18-unit minimum requirement. Three areas of specialization are offered — (i) Anatomy and Morphology, Physiology and Development, (ii) Evolution and Ecology, and (iii) Biochemistry and Molecular Genetics — with a small, strategic course selection per area.

Biological Sciences

The Biological Sciences minor provides an opportunity for students in programs outside of the College of Biological Sciences to complement their studies with a concentration in biology. Student in the minor experience the breadth of biology by taking courses in five core areas: molecular biology/ biochemistry, animal biology, plant biology, microbiology and ecology/evolution.

Molecular, Cellular and Integrative Physiology

The Molecular, Cellular and Integrative Physiology Graduate Group offers a comprehensive program of courses and outstanding research opportunities studying biological function by linking observations from molecules to populations of individuals. The group is composed of more than 80 faculty members drawn from 26 departments encompassed within the School of Medicine, School of Veterinary Medicine, the College of Biological Sciences, and the College of Agricultural and Environmental Sciences.

Integrative Genetics and Genomics

Students in the Integrative Genetics and Genomics Graduate Program have the opportunity to apply genomic, molecular, and classical genetic approaches to study model organisms, a broad range of native and agricultural species, humans, and companion animals. The group integrates genetic research across campus and unites over 100 faculty members from more than 25 departments spanning the College of Biological Sciences, the College of Letters and Science, the College of Agricultural and Environmental Sciences, the School of Medicine, and the School of Veterinary Medicine.

Population Biology

Population biology is an interdisciplinary field that uses concepts and techniques from ecology, evolution, systematics, genetics, and mathematics or statistics. Course curriculum often works near the interface between ecology, the study of interactions between organisms and their environment, and evolutionary biology, which aims to understand how populations and species evolve. Areas of research are often directed toward basic science, but also often addresses applied problems such as overcrowding, invasive species, and extinction.

Plant Biology

The graduate program offers training in the breadth of plant biology and in specialized topics represented by the following four research areas: cell and developmental biology; environmental and integrative biology; molecular biology, biochemistry, and genomics; and systematics and evolutionary biology.

Neuroscience

The Neuroscience Graduate Program is a highly interactive program that provides outstanding training in the neurosciences by a dedicated and internationally recognized faculty. Areas of research include the cellular and molecular structure of neurons, mechanisms of synaptic plasticity, development of the nervous system, organization of brain systems for motor control and processing of visual and auditory information, structure and function of memory and attention systems, and the pathobiology of neurological disorders.

Biophysics

Biophysics offers a graduate education program that focuses on the interface of biology, physics, chemistry, engineering, and mathematics, and explores the physical laws governing the properties and interaction of biomolecules and cells. The program’s faculty members have diverse research interests, which include structural biology, membrane dynamics, ion transport, electron transfer, nuclei acid, applied optics, computational biology, theory, cellular regulation, and imaging.

Biochemistry, Molecular, Cellular and Developmental Biology

The Biochemistry, Molecular, Cellular and Developmental Biology (BMCDB) Graduate Group comprises students and faculty who share an interest in studying fundamental biological problems at the organismal, cellular, and molecular levels. Experimental approaches used to address these problems range from the atomic and ultra-structural levels to model organisms that include yeast to mammals.

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