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Civil Engineering

Civil engineers are responsible for the design, construction and maintenance of structures that form the transportation, resource distribution, environmental systems and physical infrastructure of contemporary society. From bay-spanning bridges to earthquake-safe buildings, civil engineers design and build solutions to an enormous variety of problems. Increasingly, civil engineers are called upon to safeguard the health of our environment by managing and improving air, land and water quality with air, water and waste treatment systems.

Chemical Engineering

Chemical engineers apply the principles of chemistry and engineering to produce useful commodities ranging from antibiotics to zirconium. Contemporary areas of interest to chemical engineers include alternative energy, environmental processes and preservation, food and pharmaceutical production, and medicine. As a chemical engineering major at UC Davis, you'll have access to resources like scanning electron microscopes and X-ray diffractometers to enhance your study, and you may participate in research projects along with some of the most highly regarded researchers in the nation.

Biomedical Engineering

Biomedical engineering is an interdisciplinary field of study that integrates knowledge of engineering principles with the biomedical sciences. It is a very diverse field, with biomedical engineers working in areas ranging from medical imaging to regenerative medicine. Some major contributions of biomedical engineering include the left ventricular assist device (LVAD), artificial joints, hemodialysis, bioengineered skin, coronary stents, computed tomography (CT) and flexible endoscopes.

Biological Systems Engineering

As biological sciences and biotechnology become ever more important sectors of our economy, engineers will be needed to work side by side with life scientists to bring laboratory developments into commercial production. Such industries as plant and animal production, tissue culture, biotechnology, food processing, aquaculture and forest production will all need engineers with strong backgrounds in biology.

Biochemical Engineering

Biochemical engineers apply the principles of biology, chemistry, and engineering to produce useful products such as biopharmaceuticals, biofuels, biopolymers and industrial enzymes. Biochemical engineering includes cell culture processes and separation processes for biopharmaceutical production, food processing, biofuels and biological waste treatment. As a biochemical engineering major at UC Davis, you'll learn to grow cells in bioreactors and to separate their products from solutions using the most up-to-date processes and equipment available.

Aerospace Science and Engineering

Aerospace science is the study of newer and better ways to fulfill one of humanity's oldest dreams: the dream of flight. As an aerospace science and engineering major, you will help create faster, more efficient and more economical forms of aircraft. You will work with some of the foremost scientists in the field today, and you will benefit from access to unparalleled research opportunities. Your studies will prepare you not only for work in the aerospace industry, but in any branch of engineering dealing with bodies and vehicles whose applied loads are influenced by aerodynamic forces.

Biotechnology

Every living organism, from bacteria to redwoods and humans, contains DNA as its primary genetic material. DNA directs all the cellular processes creating the great diversity of life that fills the biosphere. The integrated, multidisciplinary field of biotechnology represents new advances in understanding and controlling these life processes through the development of exciting new technologies.

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